#healing Image from page 250 of “Our domestic birds;” (1913)

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Image from page 250 of “Our domestic birds;” (1913)
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Identifier: ourdomesticbirds00robi
Title: Our domestic birds;
Year: 1913 (1910s)
Authors: Robinson, John H. (John Henry), 1863-1935
Subjects: Poultry Pigeons Cage birds
Publisher: Boston, New York [etc.] Ginn and company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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seof a part of it. Under such circumstances each group will keepto its own range. The natural food of the ostrich is grass and the leaves ofshrubs and trees. In domestication it is usually pastured onalfalfa, or fed on alfalfa hay, according to the season. Thealfalfa is often supplemented with grain (principally corn), andgrit, bone, and shell are provided as for other birds. Most ostrich growers prefer to hatch the eggs in incubators,because by removing the eggs from the nests they induce thehens to lay more, and because the young ostriches are mucheasier to manage when by themselves than when with the oldbirds. When a pair of ostriches hatch their own eggs, the hensits during the day and the cock at night. The period of in-cubation is six weeks. Young ostriches are fed the same as old ones. They arekept in flocks of fifty or more until about a year old, when thesexes are separated. The plumes are cut for the first time whenthe birds are between six and seven months old. Although the

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237 238 OUR DOMESTIC BIRDS . • process of removing these feathers is called plucking, they arenot drawn out, but are cut close to the skin. The object is toget the feather immediately after it is grown, before it can besoiled or damaged in any way. At that time the quill is stillfull of blood. Drawing it out would be very painful to the bird,and might injure the wing so that the next feather that grewwould be defective. The stumps of the feathers are allowed toremain until they are dead and dry, when they are drawn outeasily. In South Africa the Kafirs draw the stumps out withtheir teeth. In about six or seven months after the stumps areremoved, the new plumes are grown and the process of pluckingis repeated. CHAPTER XVIIPIGEONS The pigeon is the only species of aerial bird kept in do-mestication to provide food for man. It is also the only usefuldomestic bird that is able to maintain itself and increase innumbers in populous districts without the care of man. Description. The commo

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Image from page 149 of “The Ornithologists’ and oologists’ semi-annual” (1889)
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Identifier: ornithologi1218891890pitt
Title: The Ornithologists’ and oologists’ semi-annual
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors:
Subjects: Birds Ornithology Birds
Publisher: Pittsfield, Mass. : W.H. Foote
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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contributing to the magazine inthe past will do so in the future, and aid me to place before ourreaders concise and readable matter that will be of value to them. The magazine is still under the same management and will beconducted in all respects as heretofore. A number of articles of merit were received too late for thisissue, but will be used in the July issue. At present there seems to be quite a boom in progress in theline of new publications relating to Ornithology and Oology.The first number of the Wolverine Natttralist is at hand andpresents a very creditable appearance. The American Osprey^Ashland, Ky., Paul B. Haskell, Publisher; and the New Eng-Imid Naturalist by George H. Clarlc, 53 Hanover St., Brookline,Mass., are advertised to appear in January. Mr. F. W. StacksOological Instructions is also announced .to appear in January.The Loon will be issued as a quarterly in the future and will beillustrated. 36 THE O. & O. SEMI-ANNUAL.

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., ORNITHOLOGIST & OOLOGIST, Boston, Mass. F. B.Webster, Publisher. Monthly, at $ i.oo per year. Size, yxio 1-3,16pp. Under the editorial management of J. Parker Norris,F. B. Webster and Frank A. Bates. WEST AMERICAN SCIENTIST, San Francisco, Cal.Samuel Carson & Co., Publishers. Monthly, 22pp, .00 a year.Edited by Chas. Russell Orcutt. Official organ of the San DiegoSociety of Natural History. OLD CURIOSITY SHOP, Riverside, Cal. E. M. Haight,Editor. Monthly, i2pp, at 35c. a year. Devoted to Philately,Numismatics, Natural History, Antiquities and Bric-a-brac. OOLOGISTS EXCHANGE, New York City. Arthur E.Pettit, Chairman. Monthly, 4pp, at 20c. a year. In connectionwith the Dec. issue is a supplement—a full page engraving,Wilson, the Ornithologist. WOLVERINE NATURALIST, Kalamazoo, Mich. MorrisGibbs, Editor. Monthly, I2pp, at 50c. a year. Official organ ofthe Kalamazoo Naturalists Association. THE NATURALIST, Kansas City, Kas. R. B. Trouslot& Co., Publishers. R. B. Trouslot,

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Image from page 356 of “India rubber world” (1899)
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Identifier: indiarubberworld49phil
Title: India rubber world
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Rubber industry and trade
Publisher: [Philadelphia, Bill Brothers Publishing Corp.]
Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden
Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden

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in operation produces this article from thehighest grade of cotton duck, the special merits of each l)randbeing commented upon. The te.xt is supplemented by illustrationsof the Ultimate and other conveyor belts. Next in order comeconducting and garden hose, in which this concern specializes,followed by steam hose, air drill and pneumatic tool hose andother hose specialties. I-ull details are then given of the 2V(Voorhees Vacuuml hose sold under that trade mark. Under-writers rubber-lined cotton and linen hose and the various othermakes of lire hose are then fully dealt with. Sheet packing and tubing follow, including the well-knownNubian packing, which has set such a high standard of ex-cellence. AheT illustrating various specialties, the catalog windsup with rubber mats and carpeting, its seventy items fully cover-ing the range of the coiupanys production. With a view to showing the extent and variety of the Voorheespriiducts. the annexed cut represents one of its large hawse blocks,

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H.\WSK lil.Ot K. THE GERMAN EMPIRE. PATENTS ISSUED (With Dates of Validity). 269,240, Class 12o (February 27, 1912). Process for introduction into rub-ber or rubljcr-iike substances of suitable carbo-hydrates. Dr.Kurt Gottlob, Elberfeld. 269,444, Class 39a (May 16, 1911). Process and appliances for vulcanizingof rubber objects of unequal thickness. Thomas Gare, NewBrighton, Cheshire, England. 269,512. Class 39b (February 26, 1913). Process for accelerating vulcani-zation of natural or artificial rubber. Farbenfabriken vorm.Friedr. Bayer & Co., Leverkusen. 269.533, Class 63e (March 28, 1912). Elastic tire with a covering of en-closed spiral springs crossing each other. Gustav Schaurer.Hanau-on-Main. 269.907, Class 47f (March 27, 1913). Closing of rubber and other hose by lip valve. Dr. Paul Enkc, Plauen. 269.908, Class 47f (May 27, 1913). Double walled suction hose, .\ugust Hey, Strassburg. 270,272, Class 39b (May 3, 1912). Production of a plastic mass for mold-ing. Hollandsche Pro

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