#healing Image from page 105 of “Science-gossip” (1894)

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Image from page 105 of “Science-gossip” (1894)
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Identifier: sciencegossip03lond
Title: Science-gossip
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Natural history Science
Publisher: London : Simpkin Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co. Berlin : R. Friedländer & Sohn
Contributing Library: American Museum of Natural History Library
Digitizing Sponsor: American Museum of Natural History Library

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anganese, seem to bethe usual destination of the ore. Harpendcn, Herts ; July. 1896. Science at Nottingham.—We have receivedthe third supplement to No. 3 Class List (Science)of the Borough of Nottingham Free PublicReference Library. It is made up to April last.There are many additions since the last cataloguewas issued. E 4 94 SCIENCE-GOSSIP. CHARACTERISTIC BRANCHING OF BRITISH FOREST-TREES. The Alder.T^HE Alder (Alnus glutinosa, Gaertn.) is a tree ofmoderate dimensions, often little more than abush, but in situations where the soil is tolerablygood, or when growing on river banks or in marshes,it will attain a height of sixty feet and upwards. By THE Rev. W. H. Purchas. {Continued from page 72.) The angle at which the branches leave the trunkis less than forty-five degrees, but they soon becomehorizontal or deflexed by reason of their ownweight. In the ultimate sprays the smallness ofthe angle which they make with each other is verymanifest. The length of the internode in vigorous,

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Alder (Alnus glutiitosa).a, Emtryo pistillate catkins; b, Embryo stamminate catkins. The leaf-arrangement is commonly such that thecycle consists of three leaves, the fourth leafstanding vertically over the first, the fifth over thesecond, and so on. Thus the divergence of eachleaf from the next (as viewed from the centre ofthe stem) is one-third of the circumference,whence it follows that the branches which arisefrom the axillary buds will stand more uniformlyaround the stem or shoot than in the elm or lime,where they are two-ranked. leafy shoots is some two inches or more, but in thesmall flowering sprays it is only from one-eighthto five-eighths of an inch. The group of catkins which constitutes theinflorescence is terminal. The staminate andpistillate flowers are borne in separate catkins.The staminate or male catkins _are arranged in araceme or small panicle, springing from the pointitself of the branchlet, the pistillate or femalecatkins, which are smaller and fewer in number, a

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Image from page 409 of “The Baptist encyclopaedia : a dictionary of the doctrines, ordinances, usages, confessions of faith, sufferings, labors, and successes, and of the general history of the Baptist denomination in all lands ; with numerous biographica
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Identifier: baptistencyclopa02cath
Title: The Baptist encyclopaedia : a dictionary of the doctrines, ordinances, usages, confessions of faith, sufferings, labors, and successes, and of the general history of the Baptist denomination in all lands ; with numerous biographical sketches of distinguished American and foreign Baptists, and a supplement
Year: 1881 (1880s)
Authors: Cathcart, William, 1826-1908
Subjects: Baptists Baptists
Publisher: Philadelphia : Louis H. Everts
Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library

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He then spent a year traveling in Europe,and on his return settled as pastor of the churchof Peckskill, N. Y. While chaplain in Sing Singhe published the Prison Hymn Book, a selectionwell adapted to prisoners, which is still in usein some of the prisons. He is also the authorof Sayings and Doings of Children, publishedby U. D. Ward, and Sunday-School Concert Exer-cises. Several of his sermons and public addresseshave also been published. Smith, Hon. John, the first pastor of the FirstBaptist church in Ohio, organized at Columbiii,near Cincinnati, in 1790. Mr. Smith was a manof fine natural abilities and most pleasing address,and became so popular in the new State that hewas elected a United States Senator during theadministration of Jefferson, and spent the rest ofhis life in political and public affairs. Smith, John Lawrence, M.D., LL.D., one of the most distinguished scientists in the UnitedStates, and equally distinguished in Europe, wasborn near Charleston, S. C, Dec. 16, 1818. He

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^mlSSW^ JOHN LAWRENCE SMITH, M.D.. I.L.D. was educated in Charleston College and in theUniversity of Virginia. At first he selected civilengineering for his profession. After devoting twoyears to the study of its various branches, in-cluding geology and mining, he was employed asassistant engineer.on the Charleston and Cincin-nati Railroad. This pursuit pr(ning uncongenial,he commenced the study of medicine, and grad-uated in the medical school of the University ofSouth Carolina, and then pursued his educationfor three years in France and Germany. Uponreturning to the United States, in 1844, he com-menced the practice of medicine at Charleston, andshortly afterwards received the appointment of as-sayer of bullion for South Carolina. At the re-quest of the sultan, he was selected by the Presi-dent of the United States, in 1846, to instructTurkish agriculturists in the methods of culti-vating cotton. On his arrival in Turkey he wasappointed mining engineer to the Turkish govern-ment, an

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Image from page 13 of “Scientific American Volume 85 Number 01 (July 1901)” (1901)
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Identifier: scientific-american-1901-07-06
Title: Scientific American Volume 85 Number 01 (July 1901)
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: gas railroad munn cents steam manufacturers american electric scientific american natural gas sheet metal sewing machine ten cents american supplement long island soft coal cubic feet bituminous coal
Publisher:

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Lraphers use that can be Bent through themail, and selling for 91 or less. Inquiry No. 977.—For manufacturers of taperedaluminium tubing. Inquiry No. 978.-Wanted the name and addressof a manufacturer of water motors; answer statingdifferent sizes made. Inqniiy No. 979.—Wanted the name and addressof a manufacturer of a successful cow milking machine. Tnquiry No. 980-—Wanted the name and addressof a manufacturer of machinery for shaving off thebark on a special foreign tree (name not given). Inquiry IVo. 981.—For manufacturers of monu-ments other than stone. Inquiry No. 982.—For manufacturers of appli-ances for light mining, such as gold pans, portablesmelters, etc. Inquiry No. 983.—For manufacturers of cheap* efficient writing duplicators. Inquiry No.. 984.—For manufacturers of coffeeroasters and mills. Inquiry No. 985.—For manufacturers of hoistingmachinery and tools suitable for building purposes. Inquiry No. 986.—For manufacturers of steelriveted masts for vessels.

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»mt^ HINTS TO CORRESPONDENTS. Names and Address must accompany all letters t-rno attention will be paid thereto. This is forour information and not for publication. References to former articles or answers should givedate of paper and page or number of question. Inquiries not answered in reasonable time should berepeated; correspondents will bear in mind thatsome answers require not a little research, and,though we endeavor to reply to all either byletter or in this department, each must takehis turn. Buyers wishing to purchase any article not adver-tised in our columns will be furnished withaddresses of houses manufacturing or carryingthe same. Special Written Information on matters of personalrather than general interest cannot be expectedwithout remuneration. Scientific American Supplements referred to may behad at the office. Price 10 cents each. Books referred to promptly supplied on receipt ofprice. Minerals sent for examination should be distinctlymarked or labeled. (8233) F.

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