#healing New Warts Remedy photos

Some warts remedy images:

Image from page 483 of “The stock owner’s adviser; the breeding, rearing, management, diseases and treatment of domestic animals” (1901)
warts remedy

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Identifier: stockownersadvis01rhod
Title: The stock owner’s adviser; the breeding, rearing, management, diseases and treatment of domestic animals
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Rhodes, Christian Kline. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Livestock Veterinary medicine
Publisher: Richmond, Va., B. F. Johnson publishing company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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Text Appearing Before Image:
Fig. 139—Enteritis, or luflammation of Bowels. cow does not roll in expressing abdominal pain, but stamps andkicks at the abdomen. Wounds, fractures, diseases of bones and joints are similar tothose of the horse. STRICTURE OF THE TEAT. This condition is due to inflammation of the gland. The milkflows in a small stream. Treatment.—The stricture should be divided by the con-cealed history, and the cow milked four or five times a day toprevent the parts adhering. This condition should be entrustedto a competent surgeon. 472 THE STOCK OW^SEks ADVISEE. WARTS. These occur both on the outside and the inside of the teats.If outside, calamine ointment will be the best remedy for re-moving it. If inside, the concealed history should be used toremove it. A calculi or milk stone is sometimes found in theteats. They can usually be removed by gentle manipulation.

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 140—Metritis. Diseases of the eyes of cattle are similar to those of the horse,except that the cow does not have the disease known as constitu-tional opthalmia. For treatment, see Diseases of the Horse. Skin diseases of the cow are not numerous. Tor treatment,see 5kin Diseases of the Horse. HOOF EVIL. This is a disease usually confined between the two claws. Thetreatment is similar to that for thrush in the horse. METRITIS. Causes, symptoms, and treatment are similar to the samedisease in the mare. XLIV.PARASITES AFFECTING CATTLE. Parasites very seldom trouble cattle. A tapeworm known bythe name taenia expansa sometimes affects cattle. It does notcause much harm. They are found in the intestines, and some-times fifteen feet in length. Treatment.—Give male shield fern, one ounce, with oil. Anounce of areca nut, in oil, may also be tried. Turpentine, threeounces in oil, may be given with good results in some cases. CYSTICERCUS BOVIS. This parasite is the cause of measles in cat

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 17 of “American etiquette and rules of politeness” (1883)
warts remedy

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Identifier: americanetiquett00houg
Title: American etiquette and rules of politeness
Year: 1883 (1880s)
Authors: Houghton, Walter R. (Walter Raleigh), 1845-1929
Subjects: Etiquette
Publisher: New York : Standard Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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Text Appearing Before Image:
emedy for ringworm — Perspiration —To ward off mosquitoes—For soft corns—To remove corns — In-growing toe nails — To remove warts — Remedy for chilblains — Toremove stains and spots from silk — To remove spots of pitch andtar — To extract paint from garments — To remove stains from whitecotton goods — To remove grease spots — To remove grease spotsfrom woolen goods — To remove ink spots from linen — To removefruit stains — To take mildew out of linen — To clean silks andribbons — To wash lace collars — How to whiten linen — To cleanwoolen — To clean kid gloves — To clean kid boots — To clean patentleather boots — For burnt kid or leather shoes — To clean jewelry —For cleaning silver and plated ware — How ladies can make theirown perfumes —Tincture of roses — Pot-pourri — How to make rosewater — Putting away furs for the summer — Protection againstmoths — To remove a tight ring — To loosen stoppers of toiletbottles 395

Text Appearing After Image:
AMERICAN ETIQUETTE.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.