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Image from page 485 of “The family flora and materia medica botanica, containing the botanical analysis, natural history and chemical and medical properties and uses of plants” (1854)
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Identifier: 39002010663616.med.yale.edu
Title: The family flora and materia medica botanica, containing the botanical analysis, natural history and chemical and medical properties and uses of plants
Year: 1854 (1850s)
Authors: Good, Peter P.(Peter Peyto),1789?-1875
Subjects: Materia medica Botany, Medical
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass., Good
Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

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has long been known as a caustic forthe removal of warts and corns, which it destroys by stimulatingthem beyond their vital powers. The juice is also said to bevery efficacious in stimulating and healing old and indolentulcers, speedily removing fungous flesh, and giving a healthyaction to the torpid and indolent granulations. Hildanus,Ethnuller, Geoffroy, and others, attest the powers of the juice,when diluted with some bland liquid in specks and opacities ofthe cornea. A cataplasm of the bruised leaves has also beensuccessfully used in herpes and obstinate psora. The dose ofthe dried root or herb, is from thirty grains to a drachm, thatof the fresh root one or two drachms, and the same quantitymay be given in infusion. The watery extract, and the ex-pressed juice, have also been employed. The dose of the for-mer is from five to ten grains—that of the latter from ten totwenty drops. In each case the dose is to be gradually in-creased until the effects of the remedy are experienced.

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N° 92. ronLtrmMHixM atuthjmiyatlie , Meadnn saffron . nakpd ladj.

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Image from page 8 of “American therapist” (1900)
warts remedy

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Identifier: americantherapis8189unse
Title: American therapist
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors:
Subjects: Therapeutics Drug Therapy
Publisher: New York : F.W. Koch [etc.]
Contributing Library: The College of Physicians of Philadelphia Historical Medical Library
Digitizing Sponsor: The College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the National Endowment for the Humanities

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ge RECENT MEDICAMENTS. Alcarno8e 18 Antipyrin is Aspirin 1 Ferratose so Kryofin 9 LaCophenin 9 PeUotlrre Muriate 18 Pnena,C£fin .; 9 Tropacbiain; 17 SELECTED FORMULAS. C^ildiens Emeiic 7 Tor Cfciolera Morbus « 15 Fcr Sciatica 19 For Gout 20 For Coryza ao London Cough Mixture ao New Publications ao Published btf THE HflERKAN THERAPIST FUBLISHI1 NEW YORK. Subscription Price .00 a year. Single Numbers 10 Cents. Entered at the New York Post Office as Second-class Mail Matter. 994 II THE AMERICAN THERAPIST. Prompt Results please busy doctors. They always Follow the use of our Brgotole. Our improved aseptic hypodermicsyringe materially shortens thetime between the dose and theeffect, and you will not have anabscess to treat afterward. Ergo-tole is assayed, aseptic, palatable,permanent, 25£ times the strengthcf the U. S. P. Fluid Extract, itnever causes nausea and neverproduces abscess when used hypo-dermically. SHARP & DOHME BALTIMORECHICAGO ~W NEW YORK Free Samples and Literature.

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Pagi LEADING ARTICLES. Lactophenin. By Clarence S. El-dkbdgk, M.D Sleeplessness : Its Cause andTreatment. By E. S. Pettijohn,M.D 23 Gall Stones. By D. C. Brockman,M.D 27 Chrysarobin a Specific for Warts.By G. W. Fitz, M.D 31 Method of Using Protargol inGonorrhoea. By J S. Nagel,M.D 32 Treatment of Pneumonia. By A.Chase, M.D 33 EDITORIAL. Patented New Remedies 35 CURRENT LITERATURE. Hypodermic Saline Solutions…. 23What the Human Body will Yield. 27 Page The Uses of Hyoscine (Scopol-amine) 36 The Pancreas in Hereditary Syph-ilid 37 The Iron in Liver and Spleen …. 37 the Odor of Iodo- To Remove form 38 Imagino-Therapy 38 Antistreptococcic Serum in theTreatment of Puerperal Infec-tion 38 Antipyrin in the Treatment ofChorea 39 Salicylic Acid in the Treatment of Pneumonia 39 Tropon 40 Thyroid Extract in Defective Children 40 Bronchitis, Formula for 40 Page Ergot in the Sore Throat ofPhthisis 35 Dermatol in Diarrhea of Chil-dren 35 Hay Fever 40 RECENT MEDICAMENTS. Antipyrin 33. 35. 39 De

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Image from page 263 of “A manual of injurious insects with methods of prevention and remedy for their attacks to food crops, forest trees, and fruit. To which is appended a short introduction to entomology” (1890)
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Identifier: manualofinjuri00orme
Title: A manual of injurious insects with methods of prevention and remedy for their attacks to food crops, forest trees, and fruit. To which is appended a short introduction to entomology
Year: 1890 (1890s)
Authors: Ormerod, Eleanor A. (Eleanor Anne), 1828-1901
Subjects: Beneficial insects Insect pests
Publisher: London : Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent
Contributing Library: University of British Columbia Library
Digitizing Sponsor: University of British Columbia Library

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an inch and a quarterin the spread of the fore wings, which are very variouslymarked with pale grey, rust-colour, or brown, with transverse R 242 OAK. PINR. dark and pale lines, the hinder wings of a grey-brown. Thefemale lays her eggs more es])ecially on Oak; the caterpillarsfrom these, which abound in May, feed mainly on animal food,and are especially serviceable in clearing off the larvae of theWinter Moth. These Cosmia caterpillars are of a generalpale dull green, apple-green beneath, and have five palewhitish or yellowish stripes running their whole length, andhave also numerous small black warts, each surrounded by awhite ring (Newmans British Moths). The above notes on Oak attacks are not offered as in anyway giving an idea of the vast number of insect infesta-tions to which this tree is subject; but in this case, as wellas with the other trees or crops referred to, it is not possiblein the space of this volume to do more than allude to a smallpart of the more important. PINE.

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1, 2, riiie shoots pierced by beetles, in section; 3, 4, Pine Beetle, nat. size andmagnified; e c, jaws; f g, chin, with feelers, &c. The Pine Beetle (the Wood Gardener or Forester asit is called in Germany, from its effective powers of pruning)is injurious to some extent to standing Pine timber by meansof its maggot-burrowings beneath the bark, both of stems andbranches; but as they appear rarely to select healthy trees ifsickly ones are at hand, and chiefly frequent fallen wood,felled trunks, or dead or decaying trees and branches forbreeding purposes, this part of their workings is chiefly hurt-ful as being the means of continuing infestation. PINE BEETLE. 243 The great mischief is caused by the beetles after they haveleft the breeding galleries beneath the bark; then they aresometimes very destructive, and especially to young Pineplantations, by boring through the side of the tender shootsand eating their way for an inch or two or more along thepith. The injury to side shoots

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.