#healing Image from page 91 of “Injurious insects of the orchard, vineyard, field, garden, conservatory, household, storehouse, domestic animals, etc., with remedies for their extermination” (1883)

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Image from page 91 of “Injurious insects of the orchard, vineyard, field, garden, conservatory, household, storehouse, domestic animals, etc., with remedies for their extermination” (1883)
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Identifier: injuriousinsects01cook
Title: Injurious insects of the orchard, vineyard, field, garden, conservatory, household, storehouse, domestic animals, etc., with remedies for their extermination
Year: 1883 (1880s)
Authors: Cooke, Matthew
Subjects: Insects, Injurious and beneficial
Publisher: Sacramento, H.S. Crocker & Co., printers
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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Text Appearing Before Image:
Cal.) (Hyphantria textor.—Harris.) Order, Lepidoptera ; Family, Bombycid^. [Living under a web on apple, hickory, walnut and othertrees, and feeding upon the upper surface of the leaves; six-teen legged caterpillars of a yellow and black color, their bodiessparsely covered with whitish or brownish hairs.] This insect passes the Winter in the pupa state, and themoth emerges during the month of May. The female depositsher eggs in a cluster on a leaf, generally near the outer end ofa branch. Each worm or caterpillar (Fig. 57a) begins spin-ning the moment it is hatched, and by their united effortsthey soon cover the leaf with a web, under which theyfeed in companies, devouring only the pulpy portion of the leaf. As they increasein size they extend theirweb, but alway remainand feed underneath it.—Riley. Fig. 57.—Fall WebWorm; a, the worm—colors, gray, black andyellow; b, the pupa—color brown ; c, the moth—color, white. The web sometimes reaches a length of fully seven feet.—

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INSECTS INFESTING THE APPLE TREE. 87 La. Baron. The young worms are of a pale yellow color, withblack heads. When fully grown they are a trifle over an inchlong; of a yellowish or bluish-gray color, the back usuallyblack; the body is sparingly clothed with whitish, reddish ormouse-colored hairs, which grow in clusters from warts whichare usually yellowish-brown, or the two rows on the back arefrequently black, or reddish-brown marked with black. Whenfully grown these caterpillars descend to the ground, whichthey enter, and form small cells in which to pass the puj^astate (Fig. 576). They spend the Winter in this latter state,and the moths (Fig. 57c), which issue the following Spring,expand about an inch and three lines and are of a pure whitecolor and without spots, except on the legs. The propertime to destroy these caterpillars is while they are young; atsuch time the branch containing the nest can be removed andits contents easily destroyed.—Riley.Remedy.—Use No. 97. CHAPTER XX

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Image from page 155 of “The standard cyclopedia of horticulture; a discussion, for the amateur, and the professional and commercial grower, of the kinds, characteristics and methods of cultivation of the species of plants grown in the regions of the Unite
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Identifier: standardcycloped02bail
Title: The standard cyclopedia of horticulture; a discussion, for the amateur, and the professional and commercial grower, of the kinds, characteristics and methods of cultivation of the species of plants grown in the regions of the United States and Canada for ornament, for fancy, for fruit and for vegetables; with keys to the natural families and genera, descriptions of the horticultural capabilities of the states and provinces and dependent islands, and sketches of eminent horticulturists
Year: 1916 (1910s)
Authors: Bailey, L. H. (Liberty Hyde), 1858-1954
Subjects: Gardening
Publisher: New York, The Macmillan Co. [etc., etc.]
Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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crowded below, more scattered andnarrower above: fls. orange. Allionii, Hort. Said to be a hybrid: 12 in. or less:fls. brilliant orange, profusely produced in spring andsummer and sometimes so freely that the plant exhaustsitself and becomes practically biennial. kewensis, Hort., is valuable as a winter-bloominggreenhouse plant, prized for its fragrance and its dark-colored fls. In 1S97 at Kew a cross was made betweenC. mutabilis of the Canarj- Isls. and a yeUow wall-flower, the cross being known as C. hijbridus; and thisin turn was crossed with a red wallflower, producingthe plant known as C. kewensis. It has the bushy char-acter of C. mutabilis; racemes upright; fls. about 1 in.across, brown in bud, or expanding brownish orangeinside and reddish brown outside, all turning palepurple with age. Prop, by cuttings. G.C. III. 3.5:123.Gn. 65. p. S9. C. dnnuus. Hort.=MatthioIa, but early-blooming forms ofC. Cheiri seem to pass under this name.—C. Mimiesii. Benth.& Hook.^Parrya. L H B

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902. Chelone glabra. (X H) CHELIDONIUM (Greek for the swallow: the fls.appear when the swallow comes). Papiivcrucea;. Cel-andine Poppy. One or two loose-growing herbs, some-times seen in old gardens. Plant with .fl.-buds nodding,and small yellow fls. in small umbel-like cluster.;;sepals 2; petals 4; stamens 16-21; style very short, the stigma 2-lobed: pod slender, 2-valved, opening firstat the bottom. C. majus, Linn., is a European plant,now run wild in waste places, and often seen in oldgardens. It is biennial or perennial, with brittle hairysts. and pinnately-parted Ivs., the lobes rounded andtoothed (or, in var. laciniatum again dissected). Theplant has bright orange juice which has been used forremoving warts. Herb au old-time remedy, used forits cathartic and diuretic properties, for promotingperspiration, and as an expectorant. Lvs. light glau-cous underneath. l H. B. CHELONE (Greek for tortoise or turtle: the corollafancied to resemble a reptiles head). Scrophularidcese.Tuktle-

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