#healing Image from page 78 of “A system of electrotherapeutics as taught by the International correspondence schools, Scranton, Pa. ..” (1899)

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Image from page 78 of “A system of electrotherapeutics as taught by the International correspondence schools, Scranton, Pa. ..” (1899)
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Identifier: 39002011210250.med.yale.edu
Title: A system of electrotherapeutics as taught by the International correspondence schools, Scranton, Pa. ..
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: International Correspondence Schools
Subjects: Electrotherapeutics
Publisher: Scranton, The Colliery engineer company [etc.]
Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

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light before you, adjustthe anode either to the patients hand or apply it to the neck orcheek. The electrode shown in Fig. 26 may be applied to themalar prominence, and will be found serviceable in other appli-cations of electricity about the eye. With the eyelid slightlyeverted and steadied by the hand of anassistant, grasp the hair to be removed withcilia-forceps and pass the needle alongsidethe hair at its base, into the follicle, andbeyond. The circuit should now be closedand the rheostat operated, so as to allow agradual increase of current from 0 to 4milliamperes. In from 10 to 50 seconds thetissues about the point of entrance of theneedle will begin to look white, and tinybubbles of gas appear. Slight traction on the hair will removeit. Withdraw the needle. The electrolytic action of thecurrent has caused a slough about the site of the follicle anddestroyed it. 18. The operation, though not severe, causes some pain.From three to ten hairs may be removed at a sitting, according

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20 ELECTRICITY IN DISEASES OF §18 to the fortitude of the patient. There is usually profuse lac-rimation and slight hyperemia may result for a few hours.Sittings may l>e held as often as every other day. It i> advisa-ble to allow an interval of 24 hours or more to elapse betweenthese applications, in order to permit all irritation to subside.In cases where the cilia are in such abundance as to make theirremoval by electrolysis impracticable, some one of the methodsof excision or transplantation will he found more serviceable.It must not be forgotten that the cicatrix resulting from mul-tiple applications of the electrolytic needle within a small spaceis by no means -light. HEKPEs ZOSTEH 19. Nal a re.— Herpes zoster, which is a painful andsometimes dangerous affection, is due to derangement of somef the branches of the supraorbital or infraorbital division ofthe tifth nerve. The disease is self-limited and seldom calls foractive therapeutic measures, save when the herp

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Image from page 461 of “The family flora and materia medica botanica: containing the botanical analysis, natural history and chemical and medical properties of plants” (1847)
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Identifier: 61631000RX2.nlm.nih.gov
Title: The family flora and materia medica botanica: containing the botanical analysis, natural history and chemical and medical properties of plants
Year: 1847 (1840s)
Authors: Good, Peter P. (Peter Peyto), 1789?-1875
Subjects: Plants, Medicinal Phytotherapy
Publisher: Elizabethtown, N.J. : P. Good
Contributing Library: U.S. National Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons, U.S. National Library of Medicine

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N ? 91 .(DIE r N Common Celandine, piletiinvl iHtriwort L,oud.Per.idG. thedine >li- in

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I . I ….Common Celandine,pileiiovl tetterwort PAPAVERACE^.jP oppyw orts* No 91.CHELIDONIUM MAJUS. Celandine, Pilewort, Tetterwort, etc. Place—Europe. Quality—Bitter, acrid, caustic. Power—Diuretic, diaphoretic, Use—Jaundice, dropsy, herpes, etc. BOTANICAL ANALYSIS. Natural Order. Rhoeadese.—L. Papaveracese.—J. Class XIII. Polyandria. Order Monogynia. Linn. Sp. PL 723. Woodv. Med. Bot. I. 140- Stephenson and Churchill II. 86. Loud.Ency. PL 460. Raf. Med. Flor. II. 207. U. S. Dis. 1240. Griff. Med. Bot. 129. Per.EL Mat. Med. II. 687. Beach. Fam. Ph. 650. Wood, Class Book, 156. T. and G.Flor. I. 162. Genus CHELIDONIUM. From the Greek ^tXi^wi, the swallow, the plant being supposed to flower with thearrival of that bird, and to perish with its departure. The English word Celandineappears to be a corruption of Chelidonium. Synonymes.—La chelidoine [.F.], Das scholkraut [Ger.~], Schelkruid [Dutch], Celi-donia [.ft.], Celidonia, [Sp.], Svaleurt, [Dan.] THE ESSENTIAL CHARACTERS

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Image from page 172 of “General paresis, practical and clinical” (1902)
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Identifier: 39002010916766.med.yale.edu
Title: General paresis, practical and clinical
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Chase, Robert Howland,1845-1921
Subjects: Paralysis Brain Nervous system Insanity
Publisher: Philadelphia, P. Blakiston’s son & co.
Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library

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ladelphia Hospital in aparetic. The sternum and ribs may become firmlyunited by reason of ossification of the cartilages.The thorax thereby becomes a rigid case, and breath-ing is only successfully accomplished by bringing intouse the accessory muscles of res-piration. Macpherson calls atten-tion to the fact that incurving with/elongation and ossification of thexyphoid portion of the sternum isquite apt to cause much pain andannoyance tothe patient in breath-ing. Among other trophic changesmay be noted the absence of thegeneral healthy appearance of theskin. A diminution of the hem-oglobin, giving a color index vary-ing from 0.5 to .85 of the normaland a lower number of red cor-puscles, are constantly to be ob-served. -^Herpes zoster andrurun-culosis, faintly indicated at first,may become so serious as to en-danger the life of the patient.4 Hematoma of lower bowel, diarrhea and gastrichemorrhage may supervene. Hematoma of the ear,another trophic change, is treated under separate head.

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Arthropathy of Knee Joint. (A. S. Roberts, vide Dana.) GENERAL PARESIS WITH ARTHROPATHY OF KNEE JOINTS. J. D.,£et. 38; white, admitted in July. He had sufferedfor some years with pain in the legs, which had beencalled rheumatic. Otherwise he was healthy up to a yearand a half before admission when he had a swelling of 152 PARTICULAR SYMPTOMATOLOGY. the knees. Six months before admission, he began tohave persecutory delusions ; he became silly and weak.Drawling speech began three months before admission.There had been no convulsions, or history of syphilis.On admission he was very demented. Both knee jointswere enormously enlarged ; grating sounds could be heardin them easily. The anterior end of the condyles of thefemur was enlarged. Shortly after admission, he had amaniacal episode. After this, he showed a grandiose delu-sional state ; he was more demented ; he talked incoherentlyabout finding immense sums of money. His speech be-came more drawling and unsteady. He managed to walkab

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