#healing Image from page 62 of “Iron corrosion; anti-fouling and anti-corrosive paints” (1900)

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Image from page 62 of “Iron corrosion; anti-fouling and anti-corrosive paints” (1900)
warts remedy

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Identifier: cu31924004666420
Title: Iron corrosion; anti-fouling and anti-corrosive paints
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Andés, Louis Edgar, 1848-1925 Andés, Louis Edgar, Eisenrost English
Subjects: Corrosion and anti-corrosives
Publisher: London, Scott, Greenwood and Co.
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ch, by increasing in thickness,become rust warts. The thickness of the layers variesaccording to the kind and duration of the rust-forming in-fluences at work, often attaining to the dimensions of amillimetre (t;.^ inch) or more, and frequently manifestinga tendency to peel ofl as already mentioned. This peelingoccurs in thin as well as in thick layers of rust, and appearsto be independent of any definite condition of thickness. IRON-COEROSION AND ANTI-COREOSIVE PAINTS. 51 The colour of rust is somewhat variable, being mostly arather bright yellowish red when newly formed, and passing,with age and increasing thickness, into dark red-brown andeven blackish brown, though paler patches may still appearamid the dark layers. Very old rust is mostly blackish brownand exhibits a more or less lustrous, almost crystalline ap-pearance. When converted into powder the colour of rustis bright yellow-red, like that of the fresh product and thenatural oxides of iron. Owing to the porous character of

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Fig. 36 (natural size).—Rolled sheet iron with apparently uninjured surface.No development of rust occurred after exposure to concentrated hydro-chloric acid for five minutes. rust it readily absorbs water and considerably retards theevaporation of that liquid. It also easily takes up fattysubstances, and these, on passing into the interior of themass of rust, s-often it and facilitate its removal by scraping.A similar effect is produced by petroleum, and it is on thisproperty that the method of cleaning rusty iron by moisten-ing it with petroleum, and then scrubbing with sharp sand,pumice, glass paper or emery paper, is based. 52 mON-CORROSION AND ANTI-COBROSIVE PAINTS. Having now become acquainted with the circumstancesunder which rust is produced, and also recognised its in-jurious effect on iron, we turn to the question, How canrusting be prevented, and what means should be employedto this end ? In principle one might reply that the best remedy is topreclude all the circumstance

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Image from page 581 of “A system of surgery : pathological, diagnostic, therapeutic, and operative” (1866)
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Identifier: systemofsurgeryp001gros
Title: A system of surgery : pathological, diagnostic, therapeutic, and operative
Year: 1866 (1860s)
Authors: Gross, Samuel D. (Samuel David), 1805-1884
Subjects: General Surgery Surgery
Publisher: Philadelphia : H.C. Lea
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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ut are apt to attain an extraordinary size. Of theexciting causes of warts, nothing is known ; they often occur in several membersof the same family, and instances are observed in which they betray a hereditarytendency. A wart is a hard, insensible excrescence, generally of a conical shape, moreor less movable, and attached by a broad base, although sometimes the reverseis the case, the union being effected by a very narrow pedicle ; its surface isrough, fissured or tuberculated, and usually a few shades darker than the adjacentskin; its size seldom exceeds that of a common pea. When cut, it is painful,and bleeds somewhat. Its structure is essentially cellulo-fibrous. The fluid whichfollows a section of a body of this kind, has been supposed, but erroneously, to becontagious, or inoculable. A wart on the face, arm, or shoulder sometimes be-comes the seat of carcinoma, especially when it is constantly rubbed or irritated. 676 DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND CELLULAR TISSUE. CHAP. I. Fig. 191.

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The treatment of warts is very simple. In young persons, in fact, they oftendisappear spontaneously. The best local remedy is chromic acid, with equalparts cf water, applied with a glass brush. It instantly turns the skin black,and forms an eschar, which drops off in six or eight clays, leaving a healthy,granulating sore, which soon heals. Tincture of iodine, acetic acid, bichlorideof mercury, and sulphate of copper, also, answer an excellent purpose. When averrucous diathesis exists, recourse must be had to the exhibition of arsenic, orDonovans solution. Excision is necessary when a wart displays a tendency tomalignancy. 2. SEBACEOUS TUMORS. The sebaceous tumor, essentially consisting of an enlargement of a sebaceousgland with a retention of its secretion, has been described under various names,founded either upon the character of its walls, the fancied nature of its contents,or the kind of structure in w^hich it originates; as encysted, atheromatous, meli-ceric, steatomatous, and fo

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Image from page 201 of “Insects injurious to fruits” (1909)
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Identifier: insectsinjuriou00saun
Title: Insects injurious to fruits
Year: 1909 (1900s)
Authors: Saunders, William, 1836-1914 Metcalf Collection (North Carolina State University). NCRS
Subjects: Insect pests
Publisher: Philadelphia : J.B. Lippincott
Contributing Library: NCSU Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: NCSU Libraries

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hue within the hind margin.This latter is divided by the veins crossing it into about fourspots, and is bordered on its anterior side by a curved blackband. When its wings are spread, this moth measures nearlythree-quarters of an inch across. It has never yet been re-ported as very destructive anywhere, and is scarcely likely torequire the application of any special remedy. No. 102.—The Blue-spangled Peach-tree Caterpillar. Callimorpha Lecontei Boisd., var. fulvicosta Clem. Very early in spring there may sometimes be found shel-tered under the loose bark of peach-trees, and sometimes also 198 INSECTS INJURIOUS TO THE PEACH. on apple-trees, small black caterpillars covered with shortstiff hairs and studded with minute blue spots. As soon asthe leaves begin to expand, these larvae issue from their hiding-places and feed upon them. They grow rapidly, and soonattain their full size, when they are nearly an inch long, andappear as shown at a, Fig. 206; c shows an enlarged side Fig. 206.

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view of one of the segments of the body, and d a back virv^of the same. The full-grown caterpillar is of a vehetjblack color above, and pale bluish, speckled with black, belowThere is a deep orange line along the back, and a more distinctwavy and broken line along each side. The warts from whichthe bristly hairs issue are of a steel-blue color, with a polishedsurface, which reflects the light so as to make them ap]>eaiquite brilliant. The larva selects some sheltered spot and there spins a slightcocoon of white silk, within which it changes to a chrysalisof a purplish-brown color, finely punctated, and terminating ina flattened plate tipped with yellowish-brown, curled bristles. The moth issues during the early part of June in theNorthern and Middle States; it is of a milk-white or creamcolor, with the head, collar, and base and tip of the abdomenorange-yellow. On the under side the anterior margins ofthe wings, the legs, and the body partake of the same hue.When spread, the wings

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