#healing Image from page 251 of “Raleigh Christian Advocate: organ of the North Carolina Conference, M.E. Church, South” (1870)

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Image from page 251 of “Raleigh Christian Advocate: organ of the North Carolina Conference, M.E. Church, South” (1870)
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Identifier: raleighchrist1901meth
Title: Raleigh Christian Advocate: organ of the North Carolina Conference, M.E. Church, South
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: Methodist Episcopal Church, South. North Carolina Conference
Subjects: Methodist Episcopal Church, South. North Carolina Conference Methodist Church
Publisher: Raleigh : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Duke Divinity School Library, Duke University
Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project.

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ore. On Monday Gov. Aycock pardoned JoeWalker, convicted last February of lar-ceny ip Iredell county and sentenced tofour years on the roads. Waker has con-sumption aod is a menace to the health ofthe otl^er prisoners. David and Martin Wright, two youngmen residiog a few miles east of Greens-boro, were attacked and bitten by a maddog Monday. They went to Haw RiverTuesday to have the time honored remedy—the mad stone—applied to the wounds. The State charters the Beaufort, More-head City and Ocracoke Steamboat company, capital ,000, with leave to increaseto ,0(K); also Ihe Enterprise Packingcompany; also of Bea\ifort, capital ,000,to pack fish, crabs, oysters, fruit and veg-etables.—Free Press. News-Observer: State Auditor Dixion,who is now busy assessiug banks for tazation, says that the small banks, as a rule,are returning their property f jr about allit is worthy bat that the larger institutionsfrequently show a disposition to get on thebooks much below their real value.

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The diseases most feared are those which are^ierited—handed do^^•n from generation to gen-eration, and family to family. By far the mostdestructive of these is Cancer, -which finds thegreatest number of its victims among the childrenan^grand-elj^ldEeBof those whose blood was tainted • .. with this dreadful malady. You may carry this poison in the blood for years, butas the vital powers bcj^ to Wane a slight bruise or cut, wart or mole, sore or Simple may develop into Cancer. From middle life to old ajje is the time whenle slumbeAig poison is most apt to break out, a sore or ulcer often degeneratinginlo Omcer, and Tumors become more progressive and ulcerate through the skin,the sljarp, shooting pains causing the most intense suffering. The Cancer patient naturally grows despondent as one after another the usualremedies fail, and the sore shows no sign of healing. The impurities that havebeen accumulating in the system, perhaps for generations, cannot be eliminated northe poisoned

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Image from page 419 of “American etiquette and rules of politeness” (1883)
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Identifier: americanetiquett00houg
Title: American etiquette and rules of politeness
Year: 1883 (1880s)
Authors: Houghton, Walter R. (Walter Raleigh), 1845-1929
Subjects: Etiquette
Publisher: New York : Standard Pub. Co.
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries

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notch in the centre of the nail, or scrape itthin in the middle. Put a small piece of tallow in a spoon and heat itover a lamp until it becomes very hot. Drop two orthree drops between the nail and granulations. Thepain and tenderness will be at once relieved, and in afew days the granulations will all be gone. One ortwo applications will cure the most obstinate cases.If the tallow is properly heated, the operation willcause little, if any, pain. TO REMOVE WARTS. Dissolve two or three cents worth of sal ammoniacin a gill of soft water, and wet the warts frequentlywith this solution. They will disappear in a weekor two. Apply a weak solution of potash in the samemanner. Wash the warts two or three times a day withstrong brine. REMEDY FOR CHILBLAINS. Apply common tar to the parts affected, and bindit up with cloth, so as not to interfere with wearing thestocking. Wear this five or six days. Dissolve one ounce of white vitriol in a pint ofwater, and bathe the afflicted parts very often.

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(414 TOILET KECIPES. 415 Dissolve three handfuls of common salt in warmwater, and bathe the hands and feet in this three timesa week. Bathe the chilblains in strong alnm water, as hot ascan be borne. When indications of chilblains first present them-selves, take three ounces of vinegar, one ounce ofcamphorated spirits of wine, mix and rub the partsaffected. TO REMOVE STAINS FROM SILK. A fluid for removing greasy stains from silk, maybe prepared by mixing two ounces of rectified spiritsof turpentine, one-fourth ounce of absolute alcohol,and one-fourth ounce of sulphuric ether. Apply spirits of ammonia with a soft rag to removeacid stains from silks. TO REMOVE STAINS AND SPOTS FROM SILK. If the soiled part is washed with ether, the greasewill disappear. Faded color may be restored by passing the silksthrough a mixture of fine soap lather and pearlash. Boil five ounces of soft water and six ounces ofpowdered alum for a short time, and pour it into avessel to cool. Warm it for use, and wa

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