#healing Image from page 162 of “Insects and insecticides. A practical manual concerning noxious insects and the methods of preventing their injuries” (1891)

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Image from page 162 of “Insects and insecticides. A practical manual concerning noxious insects and the methods of preventing their injuries” (1891)
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Identifier: insectsinsectici02weed
Title: Insects and insecticides. A practical manual concerning noxious insects and the methods of preventing their injuries
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: Weed, Clarence Moores, 1864-1947
Subjects: Insects, Injurious and beneficial Insecticides
Publisher: Hanover, N.H., Published by the author
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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figure will also serve toillustrate the appearance and mode of work of theRose Slug. According to Dr. Harris, the parentsaw-flies, in the latitude of Massachusetts, come outthe ground at various times between the 20th ofMay and the middle of June, during which seasonthey pair and lay their eggs. The females whenabout to lay their eggs turn a little to one side,unsheath their saws, and thrust them obliquely intothe skin of the leaf, depositing in each incision thusmade, a single egg. The young begin to hatch inten days or a fortnight after the eggs are laid. Theperiod of their existence in the caterpillar state prob-ably does not exceed three weeks. They have a INJURING THE LEAVES. 155> small, round, yellowish head, with a black dot oneach side of it, and are provided with twenty-twoshort legs. The body is green above, paler at thesides, and is soft and almost transparent, like jelly.The skin of the back is transversely wrinkled, andcovered with minute elevated points; and there are

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81. Pear-tree Slug: fly and larvae. two small, triple-pointed warts on the edge of thefirst ring, immediately behind the head. These gel-atinous and sluggish creatures eat the upper surfaceof the leaf in large, irregular patches, leaving theveins and skin beneath untouched; and they aresometimes so thick that not a leaf on the bushes isspared by them, and the whole foliage looks as if ithad been scorched by fire and drops off soon after-wards. They cast their skins several times, leavingthem extended and fastened to the leaves; and afterthe last moulting they lose their semi-transparentand greenish, color, and acquire an opaque, yellowishhue. They then leave the bushes, and burrow aninch or more in the earth, where each one makes foritself a small, oval cell of grains of earth, cementedwith a little gummy silk. They remain in thesepupa cells until the following season, when theyemerge as flies. 156 INSECTS AFFECTING THE ROSE. Remedies.—In cities where a stream of waterfrom a sprinkl

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Image from page 524 of “Guide to the study of insects, and a treatise on those injurious and beneficial to crops: for the use of colleges, farm-schools, and agriculturists” (1872)
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Identifier: guidetostudyofin1872pack
Title: Guide to the study of insects, and a treatise on those injurious and beneficial to crops: for the use of colleges, farm-schools, and agriculturists
Year: 1872 (1870s)
Authors: Packard, A. S. (Alpheus Spring), 1839-1905
Subjects: Insects Beneficial insects Insect pests
Publisher: Salem, Naturalist’s agency [etc., etc.]
Contributing Library: MBLWHOI Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MBLWHOI Library

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last ofthe summer. In threeweeks it becomes a beetleIt also attacks many othergarden fruits, such as thecherry, peach and quince.Drs. Harris, Burnett andothers, think the larva isbut a temporary occupantof the wart on plumb and ckeriy trees, and not a cause ofthe disease. The best remedy is jarring the trees, and catch-ing the larva? in sheets and burning them. Dr. Hulls k-cur-culio catcher is an excellent invention for destroying theseinsects ; it consists of a large inverted white umbrella, fixedupon a large wheelbarrow split in front to receive the trunkof the tree, against which it is driven with force sufficientto jar the curculios from the tree into the umbrella. The genus Ceutorliynclius is a small, short, thick curculio,which attacks the seeds of the radish and allied plants. Wehave noticed a pale gray species on the radish, which probablyinhabits the seeds. The genus Calanrlra has a slender snout slightly bent down-wards, a coarsely punctured thorax nearly half as long as the

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Fig. 4!M) COLEOPTERA.

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