#healing Image from page 140 of “Annual report” (1902)

A few natural supplement images I found:

Image from page 140 of “Annual report” (1902)
natural supplement
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Identifier: annualreport671913newy
Title: Annual report
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: New York State Museum
Subjects: New York State Museum Science Science
Publisher: Albany : University of the State of New York
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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monograph of the New York mollusca, which is in the chargeof Dr H. A. Pilsbry of the Philadelphia Academy of Sciences,has gone forward and the author reports an increasing number ofillustrations made, together with the preparation of considerableadditional text matter. It is probable that the entire work willbe brought to completion within the coming year. Myriapods of New York. The late Frederick C. Paulmier, whilezoologist of the Museum, prepared and annotated a checklist ofthe myriapods of New York, and this list was supplemented bynotes and memoranda, together with an index of the genera, madeby Professor George H. Chadwick while occupying the same posi-tion on the Museum staff. It has seemed well to bring this under-taking to completion and Dr Roy W. Miner of the AmericanMuseum of Natural History has very kindly consented to take overthe manuscripts and memoranda with the purpose of putting themin final form as an illustrated compendium of these animals as theyoccur in the State.

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Animal effigy pipes from the Dann Collection, Honeoye Falls,larger pipes at the top have brass or copper eyes The two

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Image from page 130 of “Cape Cod and the Old colony” (1921)
natural supplement
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Identifier: capecodoldcolony1921brig
Title: Cape Cod and the Old colony
Year: 1921 (1920s)
Authors: Brigham, Albert Perry, 1855-1932
Subjects: Pilgrims (New Plymouth Colony) Cape Cod (Mass.)
Publisher: New York and London, G.P. Putnam’s Sons
Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Connecticut Libraries

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aharan oases, on the shores of France, Britainor the Low Countries, on the banks of theColimibia River, and, for at least two hundredyears, in the outer parts of Cape Cod. On the French coast and elsewhere, stakeand brush fences are carried along the crest ofa dune, that the sands may lodge in andbeyond them. When the fence is engulfed an-other is erected above it, until after sufficientupward building, the winds fail to carry thesand over and a barrier dune has come intobeing which protects the inland fields frominvasion. This method has never been used on theCape, where the more widespread method pre-vails of supplementing natures protectiveefforts, by preserving natural vegetation andby artificial plantings of grasses and trees.Readers of Thoreau recall his playful imag-inings about tying up the Cape to its moor-ings, and they remember his references to thewarning-out of the townsmen in the spring toplant beach grass in exposed situations. Fewer than the readers of Thoreaus classic

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4 M The Changing Shoreline 93 sketches are those who know that one of theobjects of the agricultural explorers sent outall over the world from Washington has beento find sand-binding grasses, which wouldavail to hold dunes in place for the salvationof harbors and cultivated lands. The dangersof sand shifting have long been recognized onCape Cod and the great fear was that the sandsmight invade the harbor of Provincetown andthus destroy one of the most importanthavens on the New England coast. The force of the winter storms is little real-ized by the summer inhabitants. A singlestorm may dash the sands so effectively onwindows close to the shore that their trans-parency is destroyed. At the Highland LifeSaving Station, the life guards say that theyhave covered a pane of glass with a stencil,and have seen letters well etched in a stormblowing for three hours. Sand grains as largeas grains of wheat have been freely swept upfrom the beaches and deposited on the dunes,wind velocities of fi

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Image from page 231 of “Bird notes” (1902)
natural supplement
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Identifier: birdnotes02fore
Title: Bird notes
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Foreign Bird Club National British Bird and Mule Club
Subjects: Birds — Periodicals Birds — Great Britain Periodicals
Publisher: Brighton : Foreign Bird Club : National British Bird and Mule Club
Contributing Library: American Museum of Natural History Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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to begin with, I should give a purgative in the shape of Epsomsalts (half a teaspoonful dissolved in a wine glass of hot water).Then give a change of food. Minute insects are no good forsuch large birds. Feed on some good Thrushs food, mixedcrumbly moist with grated carrot or cold boiled potato (firstpressed through a sieve), chicken meal (without the shell-grit)scalded, can be given on alternate days. This ought to formthe staple food, which can be supplemented occasionally witha little lean beef finely chopped, with a mouse or dead Sparrowfor a change. As all the Crow tribe are practically omnivorous,an occasional hard-boiled egg and scraps from the table willnever come amiss. Of course, if the bird has caught cold, which I doubt, itmust be kept free from draughts, and, during the moult, aswarm and quiet as possible. Cover the cage bottom withdamp cocoa fibre refuse, and let the perches be about an inchand a half in diameter so that it can rest its feet firmly onthem. John Frostick.

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PAkROT AND CAT, belonging to Mrs. FRANK Al TWKIJ..rhey are very great Chums—the cat, when quite a liltle kitten, wort/</ getinto the cage, and they played together like two kittens. The parrotis delighted when the cat conies into the cage, and they play togethereven now that the cat has grown so large. To face page 197.

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